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Tuesday, October 31, 2017

DEA Reveals Cocaine Use on Rise

Cocaine use is on the rise and, not surprisingly, the drug is easily available in most areas of the country, according to the DEA's 2017 National Drug Assessment. 

Other findings in the report included:  
  • In 2016 and 2017, multiple DEA [offices] reported increases in the quantity and purity of cocaine available. 
  • First-time use of cocaine within the past year rose 26% between 2014 and 2015.
  • Workplace drug tests that were positive for cocaine increased 12% between 2015 and 2016.
  • Cocaine-related overdose deaths increased 25.2% between 2014 and 2015, reaching the highest levels in nine years. 
Yet perhaps most scary is that cocaine, already dangerous on its own, has become deadlier as more dealers have laced it with fentanyl. Between 2010 and 2015, deaths involving both cocaine and opioids have more than doubled, from 2,000 to over 4,000, according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse.

“The emergence of cocaine mixed with fentanyl and fentanyl-related substances in select markets is a potential trend of concern,” the DEA report notes. Though still relatively rare around the country, the trend has already been seen in areas including New York, Florida, Massachusetts and Tennessee. 

Spotting the Signs of Cocaine Use
If you suspect cocaine abuse by someone you care about, you should be on the look out for the following: 
  • Dilated pupils
  • Runny nose (snorting)
  • Nosebleeds (snorting)
  • Track marks (injecting)
  • Burned lips or fingers (smoking)
  • Mood swings
  • Extreme happiness and energy 
  • Aggressiveness
  • Paranoia
  • Distrustful of other’s intentions
  • Antagonistic behaviors towards others
  • Defensiveness
  • Changes in sleep (awake all night, sleeping in the day)
Getting Help for Cocaine Addiction
It’s extremely difficult to stop abusing cocaine without professional help. The Haven at Pismo provides a continuum of care that includes medical detox, residential programs for men and women, partial hospitalization, and outpatient programs. To learn more, call today: 805-202-3440



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